I need the sea because it teaches me

The lab is preparing to head out to sea this weekend to continue our effort to evaluate the effects of the Deepwater Horizon spill on microbes in deep-sea sediments.  These are enigmatic ecosystems because of their remoteness, but we have much to learn from microbes in them about the spill, and life in the deep ocean.  These trips, and the time they afford with my students and colleagues are the best part of my work.  Each time I learn something new about the ocean, my field, and myself.

To prepare for the cruise, and to celebrate World Oceans Day, I share one of my favorite poems:

The Sea by Pablo Neruda

I need the sea because it teaches me.
I don’t know if I learn music or awareness,
if it’s a single wave or its vast existence,
or only its harsh voice or its shining
suggestion of fishes and ships.
The fact is that until I fall asleep,
in some magnetic way I move in
the university of the waves.

It’s not simply the shells crunched
as if some shivering planet
were giving signs of its gradual death;
no, I reconstruct the day out of a fragment,
the stalactite from the sliver of salt,
and the great god out of a spoonful.

What it taught me before, I keep. It’s air
ceaseless wind, water and sand.

It seems a small thing for a young person,
to have come here to live with his own fire;
nevertheless, the pulse that rose
and fell in its abyss,
the crackling of the blue cold,
the gradual wearing away of the star,
the soft unfolding of the wave
squandering snow with its foam,
the quiet power out there, sure
as a stone shrine in the depths,
replaced my world in which were growing
stubborn sorrow, gathering oblivion,
and my life changed suddenly:
as I became part of its pure movement.

Happy World Oceans Day

-LJHScreen Shot 2014-08-05 at 8.30.51 PM

Postdoctoral Research Position in Marine Microbial Ecology

The Hamdan Lab at the University of Southern Mississippi seeks a qualified and highly motivated individual for a Postdoctoral Research Scientist position. This position will support research on the effects of oil spills on benthic ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically sought is a Postdoc to investigate the long-term consequences of oil and chemical dispersant exposure on the preservation of 20th century historic steel shipwreck in the deep biosphere. The individual will design and implement ROV deployable seafloor experiments to monitor microbially induced corrosion. Individuals with experience with microbiology and biogeochemistry, with specific knowledge and molecular biological techniques (DNA extraction, amplification, sequencing) are encouraged to apply. Experience and proficiency in bioinformatics and statistical analysis is desired for this position as well as proficiency with analytical chemistry techniques, including hydrocarbon analysis. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in coastal or marine sciences, geomicrobiology, biogeochemistry or similar field. The hire will be encouraged to participate in the planning and execution of oceanographic research onboard USM’s research vessel Point Sur for periods of up to two weeks at sea, and contribute to student mentoring. Excellent written and oral communication skills are needed, as well as a commitment to developing peer-reviewed manuscripts. Pending funding, the position will support the hire for 3 years, starting as early as June 2017.

About the University of Southern Mississippi

The Division of Coastal Sciences is a research and graduate education unit within the School of Ocean Science and Technology, offering programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees. The Division is located at the USM Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (Ocean Springs, Mississippi), a marine laboratory featuring comprehensive basic and applied research programs in coastal and marine biological sciences. Research program support includes state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and instrumentation; a fleet of small and large research vessels, including the R/V Point Sur; the GCRL Museum collection; the Center for Fisheries Research and Development; NSF I/UCRC Science Center for Marine Fisheries, and aquaculture facilities including the Thad Cochran Marine Aquaculture Center.

Founded in 1910, The University of Southern Mississippi is a comprehensive doctoral and research-driven university with a proud history and an eye on the future. As one of only 34 institutions in the nation accredited in art, dance, music and theatre, we are a haven for creativity and artistic expression. A dual-campus university, Southern Miss serves students on campuses in Hattiesburg and Long Beach, in addition to five teaching and research sites in Mississippi. We are among U.S. News & World Report’s most popular universities and recognized by The Princeton Review for our commitment to sustainability. Our Center for Undergraduate Research affords our students meaningful research opportunities, and as a proven leader in innovation, we conduct transformative research that translates into real-world solutions. In the classroom or lab, on the playing field, or in the performance hall, we strive to have a positive impact not only on our students, but also the world around us. Further information is found at www.usm.edu.

To apply for the Postdoc position, please submit via email to leila.hamdan@usm.edu:

  • Cover letter outlining interest and experience in the study of microbial ecology
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Contact information for three references

Please see our websites for more information about USM, the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, SOST, and studies in the Hamdan lab: https://hamdanlab.comhttp://gcrl.usm.edu/,  https://www.usm.edu/school-ocean-science-and-technology/about

 

Student opportunity available for Fall 2017

PhD and MS Graduate Research Assistantship in Marine Microbial Ecology

Location: Division of Coastal Sciences, School of Ocean Science and Technology, University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS

Description:

The Hamdan Lab, in the Division of Coastal Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi seeks an exceptional student to participate in marine microbial ecology studies in deep-sea habitats. This funded position will support independent research on the effects of oil spills on benthic ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The research assistantship will support (stipend, tuition, benefits) a highly motivated PhD or MS study for up to three years beginning in Fall 2017.

A student is sought to conduct independent research that investigates microbial population structure, metabolic capability, biodiversity and biogeochemistry of benthic environments. This position will involve laboratory studies using molecular biological techniques (DNA extraction, amplification, sequencing), bioinformatics,  classical approaches to environmental microbiology (microscopy, metabolic tracers), and analytical chemistry techniques (stable carbon isotope studies, elemental analysis, bulk carbon pool analysis).

Successful applicants will have a BS or MS degree in biology, ecology, environmental science, chemistry or other relevant field. Applicants with previous experience in molecular biology, biogeochemistry or statistical analysis are encouraged to apply. Students will be required to participate in the planning and execution of oceanographic research onboard USM’s research vessel Point Sur for periods of up to two weeks at sea. The ability to work collaboratively with students, PIs and external researchers from multiple institutions and fields on interdisciplinary studies of the deep-sea is a must. Those with experience in environmental microbiology or chemistry will be given preferential consideration. Students are expected to participate in development of manuscripts for peer review.

Individuals interested in this position should contact Dr. Leila Hamdan (leila.hamdan@usm.edu), and provide a cover letter outlining specific interests and experience in the study of marine microbial ecology or biogeochemistry and a curriculum vita. Application for Fall 2017 admission at USM is required.

Please see our websites for more information about USM, the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, SOST, and studies in the Hamdan lab:

https://hamdanlab.com

http://gcrl.usm.edu/

https://www.usm.edu/school-ocean-science-and-technology/about

Student opportunities available

Title: PhD and MS Graduate Research Assistantships in Marine Microbial Ecology

Location: Division of Coastal Sciences, School of Ocean Science and Technology, University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS

Description:

The Hamdan Lab, in the Division of Coastal Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi seeks exceptional students to participate in marine microbial ecology studies in deep-sea habitats. These funded positions will support independent research on the effects of oil spills on benthic ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. Two funded graduate research assistantships will support (stipend, tuition, benefits) highly motivated PhD or MS studies for up to three years beginning in Fall 2017.

Position #1, a student is sought to conduct independent research that investigates microbial population structure, metabolic capability and biodiversity of benthic environments. This position will involve laboratory studies using molecular biological techniques (DNA extraction, amplification, sequencing), bioinformatics, and classical approaches to environmental microbiology (microscopy, metabolic tracers).

Position #2, a student is sought to study sediment biogeochemistry, shipwreck surface properties, and hydrocarbon chemistry. The position will involve laboratory studies in geochemistry, carbon and nutrient and physical property assays.

Both positions: Successful applicants will have a BS or MS degree in biology, ecology, environmental science, chemistry or other relevant fields. Applicants with previous experience in molecular biology, biogeochemistry or statistical analysis are encouraged to apply. Students will be required to participate in the planning and execution of oceanographic research onboard USM’s research vessel Point Sur for periods of up to two weeks at sea. The ability to work collaboratively with students, PIs and external researchers from multiple institutions and fields on interdisciplinary studies of the deep-sea is a must. Those with experience in environmental microbiology or chemistry will be given preferential consideration. Students are expected to participate in development of manuscripts for peer review.

Individuals interested in these positions should contact Dr. Leila Hamdan (leila.hamdan@usm.edu), and provide a cover letter outlining specific interests and experience in the study of marine microbial ecology or biogeochemistry and a curriculum vita. Application for Fall 2017 admission at USM is required.

Please see our websites for more information about USM, the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, SOST, and studies in the Hamdan lab:

https://hamdanlab.com

http://gcrl.usm.edu/

https://www.usm.edu/school-ocean-science-and-technology/about

 

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Picture your future here

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We are Hiring! Postdoctoral position available immediately

Postdoctoral Research Position in Marine Microbial Ecology available immediately

The Gulf Coast Research Laboratory at the University of Southern Mississippi (gcrl.usm.edu) is seeking a qualified and highly motivated individual for a postdoctoral research scientist position in the laboratory of Dr. Leila Hamdan. The research will be related to the study of marine microbial communities in the deep sea, focusing on the biodiversity surrounding shipwreck ecosystems.

Highly successful candidates would have experience with microbiology and biogeochemistry, with specific knowledge and expertise in molecular biological techniques (DNA extraction, amplification, sequencing). Experience and proficiency in bioinformatics and statistical analysis is highly desired and needed for this position. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in coastal or marine sciences, environmental microbiology or similar field. The main job responsibilities will be data analysis and manuscript preparation. Fieldwork is not a requirement of the position, but opportunities are available to participate in, and design at sea studies in the Gulf of Mexico, onboard USM’s research vessel Point Sur. Excellent written and oral communication skills are needed, as well as a commitment to developing peer-reviewed manuscripts.

The position will be located at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs, MS. Opportunities to collaborate with other research disciplines at GCRL, and within the School of Ocean Science and Technology (SOST) will be available.

The position is offered for 9 months, and may continue for up to 3 years pending funding availability. The position is for immediate hire.

Please see our websites for more information about GCRL, SOST, and studies in the Hamdan lab:

http://gcrl.usm.edu/

https://www.usm.edu/school-ocean-science-and-technology/about

https://hamdanlab.com

 

To apply, please submit the following documents via email to leila.hamdan@usm.edu:

  • Cover letter outlining interest and experience in the study of marine microbial ecology
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Contact information for three references

Review of applicants will begin immediately and proceed until the position is filled.

Hamdan lab on the move

A big change has come for the Hamdan Lab.  As of Fall, 2016, the lab has relocated to the University of Southern Mississippi.  We are excited to continue our research on coastal ecosystems at Southern Miss’s Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs, MS.  More news on the move and our research to follow.

Leila H

Celebrating the Newness on World Oceans Day

Last month, our lab participated in a very successful research cruise on the R/V Pelican. This was my ~27th oceanographic research expedition, and the 7th that I have been Chief Scientist of. The focus of the cruise was mud, glorious, deep-sea mud, which we are using to study the artificial reef effect on benthic microorganisms.

Each cruise is special to me for different reasons. They range from the significance of the discoveries, the technologies, the challenges we overcome, the team work, the food (which was exceptional, thanks to our chef Dave Bhattacharya), etc. This past cruise was special for the newness:

I had the privilege of introducing three Mason students to ocean science (Sarah Brown, class of 2016, Beth Haley, and Matthew Johnson). I shared the challenge and adventure of marine studies with Dr. Joel Gaston (Naval Research Lab), who never envisioned such would be part of his job.  Our Marine Technician, Marah Dahn had her first at bat with multicoring, and with the help of Chief Engineer Rodney Redman, she was a natural, and put core, after core on the deck. Finally, I brought my Department Chair, mentor and friend, Dr. Bob Jonas, an experienced scientist and sailor back out on a UNOLS vessel after a hiatus.

A three day stretch of flat seas was a welcome treat for both science and comfort.  Through the guidance of our Captain, Nicolas Allen, we were always on or ahead of schedule. This provided time to enjoy the show that pods of dolphins were putting on daily.  Every time First Mate Erik Gravel would see a pod, he would alert the science party in seldom subtle ways (“Baby dolphins!”), and then watch the stampede to the bow.  The students asked Erik and I if we ever tire of seeing dolphins ride the bow wake.  We were unanimous: “No, it never gets old“.

On World Oceans Day, I celebrate the newness found in each cruise, my good fortune to have, and share a scientific view of the ocean that most never see, and the wonder of the deep blue that never gets old.

-Leila H

The sights and sounds of the Hamdan Lab students seeing the dolphins for the first time.

 

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Off to sea with colleagues new and old: (left to right) Preston Fulmer, Bob Jonas, Kylara Martin, Joel Gaston.

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Mason students and staff (left to right), Sarah Brown, Zeima Kassahun, Beth Haley and Matthew Johnson manage a science selfie with the multicorer and CTD.

 

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We can’t hide our love of the mud. Left to right, Sarah Brown, Beth Haley, Leila Hamdan

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…Neither can R/V Pelican crew members Dirk Wakker, Erik Gravel and Christian Williford .

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Thanks to all for another great cruise.  The PE16-23 team (left to right): Matthew Johnson, Zeima Kassahun, Bob Jonas, Sarah Brown, Rodney Redman, Beth Haley, Marah Dahn, Dirk Wakker, Kylara Martin, Christian Williford, Leila Hamdan, Nicholas Allen, Preston Fulmer, Joel Gaston, Tom Boyd. Not pictured: Dave Bhattacharya, Erik Gravel, Hernando Bacosa, Kaijun Lu